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Gregory Borse

The Bishop and the Baby

Feb. 11 at 9:12pm

Here's my question to the Bishops, who made a full throated defense against the Administration's effort to infringe upon the rights of Churches to teach and live their creeds--and to protect their institutional sister-institutions to be free of governmental infringement.

What about me, your Eminences?

I work for a secular institution that will enact the Administration's mandate requiring that my premiums pay for other people's contraceptions, sterilizations, and abortions.  So what if the Administration has said that insurers will be the ones who will be required to do this?  Isn't my compensation package inclusive of health insurance benefits in the form of my employer contributing to the amount I pay to insure my family as a portion of my freely negotiated salary?  If the law of the land says that there is NO SUCH THING as an insurer who will NOT follow the Administration's mandate, then what option do I have?  Either you've been outmaneuvered or you don't care about your flock.

Do I quit my job and go to work for a Church in order to avoid violating my conscience?  There is no exception to the "individual mandate" even though the Administration has cynically announced that there is no "individual mandate."  Yes there is.  In decreeing that insurers will be required to do what the Administration says regarding coverage for contraception, sterilization, and abortion, there is no practical "out" for individuals who do not want to pay for such services--except to forgo insurance altogether or violate our consciences.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katie van Schaijik

I received a note back from the Archbishop this morning, reassuring me that he is very much aware of the threat to individual consciences too.  He, and all those leading the resistance, need our help and support.

#7 - Feb. 12 at 2:51pm | quote

Gregory Borse

I recieved a note from Archbishop Chaput as well--he encouraged me to write to my own Bishop (who does not advertise his e-mail) so I'm going to send him a note the old-fashioned way.  I encourage other Catholics to do the same.

#8 - Feb. 12 at 3:25pm | quote

 

Jules van Schaijik

Thanks for the link Gregory. That article gives one hope. It also brought me personally some clarity. I especially liked these lines:

This is not, in other words, a situation analogous to conscription laws, where a humane society makes provision for the pacifist’s conscientious objection to a just law. In the case of the HHS mandate, tweaked or untweaked, the law itself is unjust, and must be fought until it is undone. 

#10 - Feb. 13 at 10:48pm | quote

Gregory Borse

Agreed, Jules. 

#11 - Feb. 14 at 12:04am | quote

 

Katie van Schaijik

Ross Douthat is also on the case.

#12 - Feb. 14 at 7:36am | quote

Gregory Borse

Nice and perhaps more subtle addition to the conversation--it reminds of the conflicts that arise in the epic:  they are never "right" vs. "wrong"--they are always "right" vs. "right" (bear with me here).  In Epic, what comes to be clear is that at the tribal level, the argument between, say, Agamemnon and Achilles that forms the beginning of The Iliad, is between two men who make, from each point of view, arguments that are not merely logical, but right.  In Greek Tragedy, just so:  the requirement that Orestes avenge the death of his father, at the behest (i.e. according to the law) of Apollo is right.  The crime involved in following that law--an offense to the Furies themselves--the killing of a mother by a son is also right.  Hence, Athena, must craft a solution that is Solomon-like in its wisdom.  The current argument about the mandate has suckered good-willed people on the right end of the religious and political spectrum, into believe that it's a "right" vs. "wrong" battle they wage.  It is not:  it is epic--right vs. right.  What we fail to see is that the secularist view being propunded by the Obama Administration is a religious view.

#13 - Feb. 14 at 10:31am | quote

Gregory Borse

The essentially religious war between the Left and the Right--between secularists and Christians (and Jews and Muslims, etc.) that George Weigel has elegantly captured in his book "The Cube and the Cathedral," has come to America in the form of Obamacare and its ramifications for individual freedom from state coercion, to be sure.  But, finally, the Left has subtly entered the fray with a new claim:  The State is the new religion and its claims are every bit as sacrosanct as the claims of the Church it wishes to replace.

#14 - Feb. 14 at 10:36am | quote

 

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