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Katie van Schaijik

Joined: Aug. 12, 2011

Bio:

Restless, melancholic soul of Irish descent. Born and raised in Connecticut, married to a Dutchman, mother of two daughters and three sons. I love books, conversation, friendship, delicious food, gardens, long walks and beautiful places. I am easily ensnared in politics and web-browsing. I crave silence, sweetness, poetry and peace. I am always wanting to write and ever-failing to write. All my hope is in God’s power and will to save; all my trust is in His promise.


Most recent posts by Katie van Schaijik:     (See all of them)


On speaking what we feel

Sep. 26 at 12:33pm | Comments: 6 | Most recent comment: Sep. 27 at 9:29pm

Jules and I saw an outstanding production of King Lear in Philadelphia the other day. As always with Shakespeare, I kept marveling over the ineffable breadth and depth and pith and poetry of his insight into human experience. But one line in particular stood out, I think because we've been reflecting so much on the emotions around here lately. It's among the concluding lines of the drama. Nearly all the principal characters have died or been killed. The Duke of...

About shaking the dust from our sandals

Sep. 25 at 12:31pm | Comments: 1 | Most recent comment: Sep. 25 at 4:03pm

In response to my post on soundness in relationships, friend Rebecca wrote a note at once encouraging and challenging, going right to the heart of things. Katie, thank you so much for posting this. It makes a lot of sense and I think it's a really valuable contribution to a discussion that needs to happen much, much, more frequently. I would really like to see a follow up (post? discussion? conversation?) about the "shaking the dust from your feet part."...

If it doesn’t feel like love, it isn’t

Sep. 19 at 9:24am | Comments: 3 | Most recent comment: Sep. 25 at 12:41pm

Some things that feel like love, aren't. Like seduction or eroticism or flattery. On the other hand, if it doesn't look like love or feel like love—if it's cold and condemning and feels like contempt —it isn't love. Love actually does feel like love.Sometimes love has to inflict pain. But it hates having to do that. It's sorry to give pain. It hastens to soothe and comfort afterwards. We shouldn't delude ourselves into imagining that "hating...

Truth and mercy in human experience

Sep. 6 at 12:36pm | Comments: 1 | Most recent comment: Sep. 11 at 5:55am

Cleaning my room today, I came upon an old journal and found this thought, from August 2005. I think it holds up. I am seeing more and more how the human idea of mercy is protection from truth. True mercy [divine mercy] is an encounter with Truth—which is extremely painful. I suppose it's what Purgatory is all about. We prefer the illusions that give us false consolations. At the time, I was in the midst of deep personal crisis...

Testing for soundness in relationships

Aug. 21 at 8:44am | Comments: 11 | Most recent comment: Aug. 28 at 11:48am

I don't know if I can call it the number one lesson of my adulthood to date, but it's up there. I have learned that individuals and groups who seem to be wonderful may actually be badly mired in dysfunction, that is to say, unsound. An unsound group or individual can't manage right interpersonal relations, just as an unsound physical structure can't support weight. No matter how noble their aim and how good and sincere their intentions, they will...


Latest comments by Katie van Schaijik:     (See all of them)


Re: On speaking what we feel

Sep. 27 at 9:29pm | see this comment in context

Personal healing and authentic communion.

You're right that it's especially challenging to be honest when we're surrounded by dishonesty—including the kind that rooted in denial and self-deception.

Re: On speaking what we feel

Sep. 27 at 6:43pm | see this comment in context

I should maybe clarify that I don't take "speak what we feel" to mean that we should always and wherever "spill our guts", without discretion. I think Shakespeare's dramatic context lends an important qualification. It was the weightiness of the moral moment they found themselves in that called for speech—and speech of a particular kind, viz. "from the heart."

There are other moments too—not particularly weighty perhaps—when we are asked (by people with a right to inquire) to  give an opinion, to say what we feel. In those, moments, too, it seems to me, it's incumbent on us to say truthfully what we really feel, as opposed to saying what we think we should feel.

I've read only three or four Alice Miller books. I agree with you that she's brilliant. I've learned much from her. But I tend to find her anthropology not entirely sound. She seems to me to neglect reality of our falleness, and to be too optimistic about our ability to access our entire past. 

Still. I'll take her over Freud.

Re: Too Much, Too Little, Too Late

Sep. 27 at 4:05pm | see this comment in context

You've a repeated a question that I don't understand. It makes no sense to me. Maybe you could try expressing your point another way?

Re: Too Much, Too Little, Too Late

Sep. 27 at 1:44pm | see this comment in context

What you say doesn't make sense to me, I'm afraid. Maybe I'm misunderstanding.

Yes, God is the God of all persons, not just Catholics. It doesn't follow that all persons understand Him rightly or follow Him truly.

He is omnipresent, but He isn't all there is. There is also His creation, including demons, and human beings, who, being free, are capable of creating idols and false religions, and religions that are mixed bags of truth and error, good and evil.

Insofar as other religions are true, and insofar as any human person's religious acts are sincere, they are directed toward the One True God.

Re: Too Much, Too Little, Too Late

Sep. 27 at 12:11pm | see this comment in context

I don't see the difficulty you seem to see, Peter.

There is only one God, who is a Holy Trinity of three Persons. This, as you point out, is what Catholics hold. 

But it doesn't follow that all religions share the same God, since there are also such things as idols and demons, i.e., false gods. 

Further, there are true and false and more or less adequate human understandings of God and modes of approach toward God.

There is no contradiction at all between believing that there is only one God (and that those who are sincerely religious and conscientious are relating to Him) and that some religious doctrines are false or inadequate.

What we think separates Catholicism (and Judaism) from all other religions is that our faith is grounded on God's Revelation of Himself, not on our philosophies or speculations or traditions about the meaning of religious experience.

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