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Devra Torres

Joined: Feb. 26, 2012

Bio:

Roman Catholic of Jewish background; Master of Philosophy turned homeschooling mother of eight. Freelance ttranslator, editor, writer, and bookseller.  Studied at the Thomas More College of Liberal Arts and later at the International Academy of Philosophy in Liechtenstein. Happily married to Max Torres; happily settled, God willing, in unexotic Ann Arbor, Michigan after stints in Israel, Rome, Liechtenstein, and Barcelona. Ready to emerge from intellectual semi-hibernation with the impending maturity of my littlest boy, who has now attained the ripe old age of five.


Most recent posts by Devra Torres:     (See all of them)


Protagoras and Me

Apr. 15 at 11:14pm | Comments: 1 | Most recent comment: Apr. 17 at 11:55am

I thought I believed in objective truth.  Then my eight-year-old got diabetes, and I realized I had just been pretending.  It turned out that, practically speaking, I was a relativist. What's a practical relativist?  Well, did you ever hear of “practical atheism”?  Atheists who know they’re atheists believe there is no God, and they can tell you the reasons why.  These may be carefully considered, coherent reasons, or they may not,...

Everybody’s a Critic

Apr. 5 at 5:41pm | Comments: 4 | Most recent comment: Apr. 10 at 4:49pm

I haven’t seen God Is Not Dead, The Son of God, or even Frozen.  I did just see Noah, but don’t worry, I’m not going to talk about it--or, if I find I can’t help myself, I will try very, very hard to say something new. I cringe as heartily as anybody at the spectacle of Christians trying too hard to like cheesy movies because they’re wholesome, or...

The Neomalthusianism of Captain Kirk

Mar. 10 at 9:10pm | Comments: 2 | Most recent comment: Mar. 17 at 2:32pm

I have a confession to make. I'm a Star Trek fan.  Not the movie versions. I tried to watch one of them once, but it was too much like being imprisoned in an unpleasantly frenzied video game. Not even The Next Generation, or whatever the remake is called. I mean the old, old, OLD Star Trek, the version that was already a rerun during my annual childhood visit to my grandparents’ house.  (Every year my sister Abby...

Surprise Diagnosis

Feb. 27 at 11:21pm | Comments: 0

Last Tuesday, I brought my eight-year-old in for a checkup, sensing that something wasn’t right. My mother’s intuition only took me so far, though:  I assumed that, whatever it was, a week of amoxicillin would probably take care of it.  But it turned out to be juvenile diabetes. Her prognosis looks very good, but treatment is time-consuming, especially for us beginners!  So it’s a fine day for 7 Quick Takes.  (Thanks...

The Worst Kind of Hobby

Feb. 16 at 6:51pm | Comments: 2 | Most recent comment: Feb. 18 at 11:16am

“Apologetics is a hobby of mine.” As soon as I'd said it, something didn’t sound right. My friend was looking into becoming Catholic, and I was offering to answer any questions she might have.  I’m a convert and a bookworm, and over the years, I’ve studied a lot of theology.  Just the hours I’ve logged listening to Catholic Answers radio while chopping onions for supper are probably the...


Latest comments by Devra Torres:     (See all of them)


Re: Everybody's a Critic

Apr. 10 at 4:49pm | see this comment in context

Patrick, I read Brian's article, with great interest.  I've heard some responses to it, the gist being that many of the gnostic elements he identifies are not exclusive to gnositicism, and are motifs used by the Church, espeically early on.  I found the responses quite convincing, though not entirely.  I thought the movie was very thought-provoking, but I do think it's a mistake to let ourselves get sidetracked by lining up as pro- or anti-Noah, or any other movie.  Even with something like Passion of the Christ, about which there was a lot more unanimity among Christians, I didn't like the way people were sometimes pressured into seeing it, or the way it was treated as a litmus test.

Re: Everybody's a Critic

Apr. 6 at 4:41pm | see this comment in context

Kate, thank you!  If you do change your mind and see Noah, you'll enjoy it a lot more if you read Fr. Ed Fride's take on it, and Patrick Coffin's, to head off possible misunderstandings.  But of course nobody has to see it--I'm even having second thoughts about writing about it, not being someone who thrives on conflict!

Re: The Neomalthusianism of Captain Kirk

Mar. 17 at 2:32pm | see this comment in context

You see the same kind of thing with the issue of divorce: the movement from sanguine 70's-stryle assumptions that the freedom to divorce for whatever reason would lead to more happiness for just about everybody.  With all the data, and especially all the personal experience, about the unhappiness and poverty that has come of the no-fault mentality, people don't talk that way anymore.  But it hasn't played itself out--now we've shifted to reluctance to get married in the first place, or a radical uncertainty about what we even want to call marriage.

Re: Should We Redistribute the Children?

Feb. 14 at 10:23am | see this comment in context

I also meant to make it clear that even in the context of current US politics, the whole tendency to move away from giving importance to biological bonds is something that different people are on board with for very different reasons, many of them having to do with compassion, misunderstood or otherwise.   People have bad experiences with their own parents, or they're sympathetic to adoptive parents, or they're misguidedly concerned for the equality of homosexual couples, or they're misguidedly concerned for the good of the children.  Requiring parents to get a license to procreate is a terrible idea that keeps popping up, but not everyone who finds it plausible is a power-hungry brainwasher--some people are concerned for the good of the children, and think that the more control the authorities have over these matters, the safer the children will be.  

Re: Should We Redistribute the Children?

Feb. 14 at 10:18am | see this comment in context

Jules, that's true. I was probably being overly parochial--seeing the whole thing in the context of current American politics.  I remember being struck when we moved to Spain about how everybody sent their kids to daycare very, very young, but it had a whole different cultural meaning.  To most people, it was just what one obviously does for the good of the children--keeping them at home for their own benefit, or because a mother didn't work outside the home, was not even something that occurred to anybody.  It had nothing to do, in anybody's mind (as far as I could tell) with indoctrination, secularist or otherwise.  It was just part of forming them to be fit for society.  In America, if a stay-at-home mother sent her 18-month-old to daycare it meant one thing; in Spain, it meant another.  I still held off, but I understood others' reasons better.

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