Amazon.com Widgets

Fr. Michael Najim

Joined: Apr. 10, 2012

Bio:

I am a Roman Catholic priest in the Diocese of Providence, RI. I graduated from the Franciscan University of Steubenville in 1996, attended St. John’s Seminary in Brighton, MA from 1997-2001, and was ordained in 2001. Currently, I am the Diocesan Vocation Director and Chaplain at La Salle Academy; in July, I will begin as Spiritual Director at Our Lady of Providence Seminary while continuing as chaplain at La Salle.


Most recent posts by Fr. Michael Najim:     (See all of them)


Revelation, Interiority, and the Gift

Apr. 13 at 5:49pm | Comments: 1 | Most recent comment: Apr. 14 at 8:17am

In Christian spirituality we often refer to growth in the "interior life." The more I ponder this gift of the interior life, the more I am amazed by the very mystery of human interiority. The Catechism of the Catholic Church states that the human heart is "the place of encounter." It is in our very interiority that we encounter the living God. Because we possess interiority, we are able to be conscious of God, to communicate with God, to know...


Latest comments by Fr. Michael Najim:     (See all of them)


Re: Interpreting the Pope through personalism

Nov. 7 at 5:02pm | see this comment in context

Katie,

Some of the comments on your article are not of the Holy Spirit. It's so sad that people aren't grasping the heart of his words. Read his homily from yesterday. He constantly challenges and inspires me! 

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2014/11/06/pope_at_mass_god_goes_to_the_limit_so_no_one_should_be_lost/1110326

Re: Interpreting the Pope through personalism

Nov. 6 at 10:30pm | see this comment in context

Katie,

I was edified by your article. Spot on! Like Francis once said, I am a son of the Church. But I've been greatly discouraged by the lack of receptivity, even resistance, on the part of some "traditionalists" to our Holy Father's words and sentiments. He is attempting to stretch our hearts and to encourage us not to be afraid to personally enter into the wounds and sufferings of people. It's easy to hide behind dogma and therefore not be vulnerable in receiving people's pain. But we must be like Christ encountering the woman at the well: we must enter into their pain, journey with them, and lead them to the splendor of truth. 

As a priest, I continue to be inspired and challenged by Pope Francis. He is a gift! 

Fr. Michael Najim

Re: Catholicism and Personalism: Not Such Strange Bedfellows

Apr. 12 at 5:26pm | see this comment in context

Devra,

I think you offer a great insight.  People often see the "rules" of Catholicism as restricting, when in fact they bring us true freedom.  Fr. Robert Barron uses the example of Michael Jordan: Jordan is one of the greatest basketball players of all time; he was completely free when he played the game, precisely because he mastered the basics...the rules.  Or think of a concert pianist: he/she is completely free to play the piano precisely because his/her freedom has been shaped by conforming to the rules, the basics.  We become more free by living the virtues, and these same virtues shine forth differently from each one of us.  That's what we see in the lives of the saints.  Charity is charity, but it is embodied (personalized) differently in my life than in Mother Teresa's. 

Great thoughts.  Thanks!

Stay informed

Latest comments

  • Re: The Weary World Rejoices
  • By: Gary Gibson
  • Re: Assessment Run Amok
  • By: Devra Torres
  • Re: Assessment Run Amok
  • By: deb
  • Re: Some power struggles are good and necessary
  • By: Katie van Schaijik
  • Re: Some power struggles are good and necessary
  • By: Katie van Schaijik
  • Re: Some power struggles are good and necessary
  • By: Gary Gibson
  • Re: Some power struggles are good and necessary
  • By: Katie van Schaijik
  • Re: Some power struggles are good and necessary
  • By: Rhett Segall
  • Re: Cutting ties
  • By: Leonie
  • Re: Cutting ties
  • By: Leonie

Latest active posts

Reading circles

Lectures