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Matt Chominski

Joined: Nov. 16, 2011

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Re: To get Beauty, bring back the critics!

Aug. 6 at 3:36pm | see this comment in context

Thank you, Jules, for your response. I think you have the categories correct and that the epistemological question is foremost in my mind. 

How does one articulate why it is that Mozart trumps Taylor Swift musically? Would I be right in assuming it has something to do with our shared human nature and that which ennobles it, draws it higher, captivates it? But that has to be tied somehow to those values that are somewhere out there, which brings us into touch wth the metaphysical question.

I recently read the following, perhaps it sheds some light?: http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2012/08/5770

Re: To get Beauty, bring back the critics!

Aug. 2 at 4:05pm | see this comment in context

Good post, Jules. I am wondering though, how does one make a case for objective values in regards to where these values rest or originate? Is it in the order of things, nature, the Divine? 

Outside of an appeal to the judgment of the educated community--which certainly is a great authority--how does one make a case that this thing is good, and that thing is not? Does much depend on what ennobles us as persons? If so, how does one argue for the noble versus the ignoble?

I don't pose these questions because I doubt the presence of objective values, but I believe answers to them would help articulate defenses on their behalf. 

Re: Personhood and the Kingship of Christ

Nov. 21 at 7:15pm | see this comment in context

Interesting question about personhood and royalty. An initial thought: since royalty would imply some notion of sovereignty, would a person's self-possession and self-determination bring us towards a concept of royalty as being part of the very concept of the person? As in, since the person has control over a certain domain, namely himself, there is some sense of ruling as well as responsibility to himself as a king or queen would be responsible to his/her subjects and realm. 

I must admit that I was not initially inclined towards acknowledging an essential link between the person and it entailing royalty. But I am open to persuasion. 

Re: Two thoughts about Steve Jobs

Nov. 18 at 9:55pm | see this comment in context

Interesting post, Jules. I've had such a consideration come to mind from time to time. That is, on death and the meaning of human life and action, It seems that even the mundane or every-day drudgery can take on meaning in the light of eternity, while, if death were to be the end of it all, so much of human life would seem to be marked by empty futility.

But, in the face of a serious doubt and unsurety about an afterlife, what are a person's options? A stoicism or hedonism? Despair, though this can't last for long. I would think a subtly defiant stoicism in pursuit of natural virtue or a certaiin drive for human greatness and excellence would be the noblest options in the face of a belief in no eternal existence.

Thoughts? (apologies if this comment is halting, I'm typing with one hand with a sleeping toddler in my other arm.)

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