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Chris Ramsey

Joined: May. 30, 2012

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Re: Immigration: Impediments to the Conversation

Jul. 23 at 10:03am | see this comment in context

Katie,

Not too late at all, and I appreciate you pointing this out to me.  I agree with you that more work needs to be done in this area and I'm hopeful because the truth will prevail.  I struggle with semantics sometimes - why does the term "justice" require modification with qualifiers like "social" or "economic"? - but that horse has already left the barn.

Thanks again!

Re: Immigration: Impediments to the Conversation

Jul. 21 at 11:16pm | see this comment in context

I'm Catholic - passionately!  I was recently asked to chair a "Social Justice" committee in my parish (in Rochester NY - an interesting place to say the least) but I fear I'm much too conservative for this area.  At heart I'm a Texan (Houston, Brownsville, College Station)  and New York is hard to fathom (even after 22 years).  Let's just say it's hard to relate to other "Catholics" in my neck of the woods.  They have very strong feelings about immigration (along with many other topics), but no clue when it comes to the reality.

Re: Immigration: Impediments to the Conversation

Jul. 21 at 5:45pm | see this comment in context

I haven't commented on this site in a long time, but something caught my eye and I couldn't resist.  Devra made a statement I've heard and seen before - "a hungry man stealing a piece of bread from a bakery is not really stealing at all" - and this rings false to me.  I'm sure you're aware of the term "justifiable homicide".  The point I'm trying to make is that, though it may indeed be justified (self-defence, for example), it's still homicide.  Is there such a thing as "justifiable theft" when circumstances are desperate?  I would say yes, but I can understand that someone else may be skeptical.

With regard to immigration, are we saying "a desperate person entering our country illiegally for work, safety, security, healthcare, education (this list could go on and on) is not really breaking the law"?  Devra, I apologize if I'm taking your point too far!

I believe that what's happening on our southern border is criminal, but the "illegal immigrants" (which is what they are) are not the actual criminals (especially the unaccompanied minors).  I grew up in Brownsville TX and I can't remember anything like the current situation.  

Re: A few personalist insights about conjugal love

Apr. 17 at 4:28pm | see this comment in context

Hello, and Happy Easter!  It's been a long time since I've offered comment on this site.  I look in from time to time, but this particular article and the associated comment thread caught my attention.  I live in Rochester NY, and know a few graduates from McQuaid Jesuit.

I'm sitting here trying to compose this, and find myself sighing deeply, and repeatedly - I don't even know where to begin!  Rhett mentions that "the high school dance is a sexual ritual meant to facilitate a maturing of the relationship between  boys and girls", and that very idea was running through my mind as well.  Dancing is most definitely a highly stylized form of social contact which is intended to allow a "give and take" strongly suggestive (too strongly, in most cases) of sexual union.  To put it bluntly, dancing is not a typical behavior between friends. I've never asked a male friend to dance.

Rhett didn't mention that McQuaid is also an all-boys school.  Can someone remind me of the purpose for all-boys and all-girls schools?  Another deep sigh.

Re: On Prayer, Both Second-Hand and Spontaneous

Aug. 24 at 7:13pm | see this comment in context

"...trembling lips and tear-stung eyes."  This short phrase has moved me to post my very first comment as a relatively new member of The Personalist Project!  Having experienced moments when my lips trembled and tears spilled from my eyes as I prayed (a Psalm, a Rosary, the responses to the Liturgy of the Eucharist, a spontaneous prayer), I can only say I've been blessed with a deepening sense of "praying with the Church."

I'd like to recommend a book called "Beginning to Pray" by (then) Archbishop Anthony Bloom of the Russian Orthodox Church.  He died a Metropolitan bishop in 2003.  Anyway, the book was recommended to me some years ago by my parish priest and I refer back to it often.  Good book!  It touches on three types of prayer - spontaneous, short vocal, and ready-made.  It's very short but packed with good stuff!

My prayer right this moment is that God continue to bless this wonderful project!

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