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John Crosby

Joined: Nov. 25, 2011

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Most recent posts by John Crosby:     (See all of them)


Dietrich von Hildebrand

Apr. 24 at 6:22am | Comments: 0

Dietrich von Hildebrand Dietrich von Hildebrand was born in Florence in 1889, the son of the German sculptor, Adolf von Hildebrand.  He was educated by tutors at home until he began his university studies in Munich in 1906.  Between 1909 and 1911 he spent several semesters studying in Goettingen with the great Edmund Husserl, the father of phenomenological philosophy, and in 1912 he completed his doctorate.  In Goettingen he also studied with Adolf Reinach, whom he always venerated as his real teacher...

John Henry Newman

Apr. 24 at 6:21am | Comments: 0

John Henry Newman John Henry Newman (1801-1890) was educated at Oxford and was ordained a priest in the Church of England in 1822.  In 1833 there arose in the Church of England a reform movement known to history as the Oxford Movement.  From the beginning Newman was the guiding spirit of the movement, which sought to recover the apostolic and patristic roots of the Church of England.  For the 12 years of the Oxford Movement Newman was prodigiously productive as...

Karol Wojtyla / John Paul II

Apr. 24 at 6:19am | Comments: 0

Karol Wojtyla / John Paul II Karol Wojtyla was born in Poland near Cracow in 1920.  When he entered the Jagellonian University in Cracow in 1938 he studied Polish literature with a special emphasis on Polish drama.  The university was closed the following year by the occupying Germans.  Wojtyla soon discerned a call to the priesthood and began his studies in an underground seminary.  It was here that he encountered philosophy for the first time-in the manuals of Scholastic...

Solidarity

Feb. 8 at 7:00am | Comments: 2 | Most recent comment: Feb. 14 at 5:57am

Editor’s note: What follows is the last of a 10 part series on the personalist philosophy of Pope John Paul II written some years ago for Lay Witness Magazine. We asked and received permission to re-publish the series here, to give fresh occasion for discussion of timeless truths. "Solidarity" was not only the name of the famous Polish labor union which, inspired by the person and teaching of Pope John Paul II, precipitated the non-violent collapse of Communism in...

Embodiment and Morality

Feb. 1 at 7:00am | Comments: 0

Editor’s note: What follows is the ninth of a 10 part series on the personalist philosophy of Pope John Paul II written some years ago for Lay Witness Magazine. We asked and received permission to re-publish the series here, to give fresh occasion for discussion of timeless truths. In our last installment we got acquainted with Pope John Paul II's teaching on the embodiment of human persons. We saw how strongly he affirms the destiny of the human body...


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Re: Persons Are Unrepeatable

Jan. 5 at 4:43pm | see this comment in context

Tim Cronin, Jan. 5 at 12:03pm

The beloved one is unique because he or she is the beloved of someone, his or her beloved one. This o the only identity that makes him ore her unique: it is a relational identity.

This does not sound right. Whoever loves another is drawn to the other in the consciousness that the other is unrepeatably beautiful. This means that the unique beauty of the other grounds my love: but this is the opposite of saying that my love grounds the uniqueness of the beloved person. You eliminate the uniqueness of a person as a motive for loving that person, if you make this uniqueness a result of loving that person. The idea that a person, considered apart from being loved, is replaceable by any other, and that he is constituted as unreplaceable only by being loved, is incoherent. What one really wants to say, and what is quite coherent, and indeed very true, is that a person flourishes in his or her unique personal identity, he or she manifests it fully, only in the giving and receiving of love.

Re: Persons Are Unrepeatable

Jan. 1 at 9:26pm | see this comment in context

I think Jules and Katie are right to resist the view that dissolves a person into his or her relations to others (not that Tim Cronin means to say this).  If you go too far in reducing persons to their relations to others, then how can you make sense of the personhood of a human embryo, which has as yet no conscious relations to anyone?  I-Thou relations are indeed essential for the full flourishing of a person, but if they are essential for the very being of a person, then embryos are not persons. Furthermore, in our enthusiasm for I-Thou relations we have to take care not to make non-sense of authentic self-love.  There is such a thing as accepting oneself or hating oneself.  There are relatively few people, I think, who achieve a well-ordered self-acceptance.  This means that the relations by which a person establishes himself or herself are not just relations to others, but to oneself as well.  We should, I suggest, affirm a polarity of self and other, and take care to avoid a reduction of self to other.  This has nothing to do with the individualism that Tim Cronin rightly opposes.

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