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Josef Seifert

Joined: Oct. 16, 2011

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Most recent posts by Josef Seifert:     (See all of them)


What is the most fundamental human right? Part 3: Three contenders

May. 4 at 11:13am | Comments: 3 | Most recent comment: May. 5 at 8:18pm

We have said that in a certain sense the right to life is the most fundamental and basic natural human right. Now we have to clarify in which sense this is true and which are other points of view perceived from which it is not the most fundamental one, and whether these other points of view to determine the most basic human right are more foundational or fundamental ones. We will here omit the purely historical point of view, which...

What is the most fundamental human right? Part 2: The Right to Life?

May. 4 at 10:22am | Comments: 0

The Right to Life is, in a sense, the most Fundamental and Basic Absolute Natural Right (Urgrundrecht) The right to life is not only a natural and an “absolute right,” as also the right to the freedom of religion or the right to choose one’s wife freely upon her consent, but it is also an, or even in a certain sense the, absolutely foundational concrete human right (Urgrundrecht). This does not exclude that other fundamental human...

What is the most fundamental human right? Part 1: Rights vs. Obligations

May. 4 at 9:59am | Comments: 0

1. Personhood and Human Dignity as Foundation of Ethical Obligations and Fundamental Human Rights Most of ethics rests on the insight into the sublime dignity of persons. Every human person, regardless of age, sex, race or other differences between different members of the species man, possesses a unique value, called "dignity," which lifts him or her up above all impersonal creatures.[1] This human dignity is the source of a strict moral obligation to respect it during all phases of human life....

Should A Cardinal Confirm A Practicing Homosexual Parish Council Member? Some Critical Reflections

Apr. 23 at 10:20pm | Comments: 16 | Most recent comment: Apr. 29 at 7:54am

The following reflections are not exclusively from the viewpoint of personalist philosophy. But they do contain philosophical distinctions whose fruitfulness for concrete decisions in Church administration and Church politics will, I hope, become clear as they are made. The following reflections are those of an Austrian Catholic who laments a decision of a Cardinal of his distant home-country, for whom he feels much respect and the affection of an old friendship. The facts are well known: Christoph Cardinal von Sch...

Does Freedom of Conscience not Matter if Obama pays? - AND Socrates’ Advice to Cardinal Dolan

Mar. 11 at 10:40pm | Comments: 9 | Most recent comment: Mar. 12 at 11:59pm

Socrates’ Advice to Cardinal Dolan: it is better for man to suffer injustice than to commit it. Many concerned citizens, Catholics, Lutherans, Baptists, Jews, Muslims, and even some atheists, have voiced their deep concern over the attack on the freedom of conscience and religion that we now suffer in the USA. Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York, in his impressive letter of March 2, 2012, expressed his deep concern and shock, alluding even to the hard times which may...


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Re: What is the most fundamental human right? Part 3: Three contenders

May. 5 at 8:18pm | see this comment in context

Postscript:

Dear Jules,

Still more in the present debate: the recent Gosnell case and the question why he may be sent, for his abominable murders of born babies, to the death row for infanticide (first degree murder), while others who snip babies' necks and slaughter children just seconds before they leave the mother's body, go free, gives to the question of the source of the right to life great importance. Moreover, also the rights to the freedom of conscience and of religion, and the right to be treated according to the dignity of persons, are now and always of exceedingly actual significance, especially now in the United States in face of the pressure Obama-care and the US government put on, and against, the freedom of conscience of pharmacists, doctors, hospitals and Christian Universities.

Re: What is the most fundamental human right? Part 3: Three contenders

May. 5 at 8:16pm | see this comment in context

Dear Jules,

Thank you for your kind comment. There was, apart from several lectures I gave on this topic, no immediate cause for writing this except my general commitment, so long neglected, to write posts on your valuable homepage and my publishing soon in the Journal of East-West Thought (which publishes a series of articles of mine and of IAP-related phenomenological realists) a longer article on the same issue.

Additionally, of course, the political and moral battle about the right to life, the billions of murdered unborn children ( in China alone over the last decades 1 billion and some hundreds of million children and in the USA probably not so many less have been aborted over the decades since 1973), and the world-wide movement of open or secret pro-euthanasia laws, make any reflection on the right to life as a most basic human right an issue of extreme interest for all of us and for politics.

Re: Should A Cardinal Confirm A Practicing Homosexual Parish Council Member? Some Critical Reflections

Apr. 24 at 12:48pm | see this comment in context

Thank you all for your encouraging and helpful comments. Josef S

Re: Should A Cardinal Confirm A Practicing Homosexual Parish Council Member? Some Critical Reflections

Apr. 24 at 10:10am | see this comment in context

“Membership on a parish council (c. 536) seems to qualify as holding “ecclesiastical office” (c. 145). Holding ecclesiastical office (as opposed, say, to participation in the sacraments) is not a fundamental right of the faithful, and ecclesiastical authority has considerable leeway in setting out the qualifications for holding Church office (cc. 145, 148, and 223). To be eligible for ecclesiastical office, one must be “in the communion of the Church” (c. 149 § 1). Full communion with the Church is defined, for juridic purposes, as one’s being “joined with Christ in [the Church’s] visible structure by the bonds of the profession of faith, the sacraments, and ecclesiastical governance.” One’s assumption or retention of ecclesiastical office can be declared invalid only for reasons “expressly required” by law for valid assumption or retention (c. 149 § 2).”

Re: Should A Cardinal Confirm A Practicing Homosexual Parish Council Member? Some Critical Reflections

Apr. 24 at 10:02am | see this comment in context

Thank all of you for the comments. Especially in the light of other relevant canons of CIC, I am obliged to Ed Peter's blog, and will add a quote from his bloq, after my quote from CIC:

Can. 512 §1. A pastoral council consists of members of the Christian faithful who are in full communion with the Catholic Church—clerics, members of institutes of consecrated life, and especially laity—who are designated in a manner determined by the diocesan bishop.

§2. The Christian faithful who are designated to a pastoral council are to be selected in such a way that they truly reflect the entire portion of the people of God which constitutes the diocese, with consideration given to the different areas of the diocese, social conditions and professions, and the role which they have in the apostolate whether individually or joined with others.

§3. No one except members of the Christian faithful outstanding in firm faith, good morals, and prudence is to be designated to a pastoral council."

Ed Peters in his blog adds important explanations and references to Canon Law. I quote:

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