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Marie Meaney

Death and Providence

May. 20, 2013, at 3:14am

Over the last two months, eight friends and acquaintances of my family have died. Some deaths were expected, but many took us by surprise: two road-accidents, a sudden heart-attack occurring during sleep, a few cancer-deaths that suddenly took a turn for the worse etc. Some of the dead had been pious, some had distanced themselves from the Church, some hadn’t cared about religion at all. For the bystanders and mourners, death has a way of pulling them out of the hustle and bustle of the everyday; everything comes to a standstill, and what really matters is able to come to the forefront. The ultimate seriousness of it, the finality, the last judgment that everybody must expect shakes one

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Devra Torres

Peter

Oct. 15, 2012, at 10:01pm

“What were you thinking?

It’s finally happened: I’ve been a mother so long that I now address the All-Wise God like one of my kids, maybe a recalcitrant toddler or a teenager in the throes of a mood swing—someone who needs to be encouraged to think rationally.  But this was the prayer that kept coming to mind when I heard the news that our friend Peter

had died suddenly and altogether unexpectedly.  

I’m abandoning my futile attempts to try to write about something else this week.  Luckily, Peter is relevant to personalism, if only because by age 23 he had already “become who he was,” as John Paul the Great urges everybody to do.

Everyone who knew him could have easily imagined him

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Michael Healy

An Extraordinary Grace

Oct. 4, 2012, at 3:39pm

In my second year of graduate school at the University of Dallas, in the Fall of 1974, my father died.  We’d been expecting it, but it still came as a shock. That’s the way death is.  Even if you know it’s coming, it’s always an unexpected surprise.  It just seems so wrong and out of place.  (And, of course, it is not what God originally intended; it is unnatural, a result of sin.) 

We’d been told the previous Christmas that it would be his last, that he had less than a year.  I was home for the summer and he grew increasingly weak.  My sister, who was engaged, arranged for her wedding in early September so that he could be a part of it.  He was able to come to the church—the last time he

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Katie van Schaijik

Peter Hitchens’ eulogy for his brother

Dec. 17, 2011, at 8:17am

A friend at Ricochet shared a link to Peter Hitchens' public response to the death of his famous, militant atheist brother, Christopher, yesterday. It's a beautiful and moving tribute from someone with a philosophical habit of mind.

Much of civilisation rests on the proper response to death, simple unalloyed kindness, the desire to show sympathy for irrecoverable loss, the understanding that a unique and irreplaceable something has been lost to us. If we ceased to care, we wouldn’t be properly human.

The relationship between the two was notoriously fraught with tension.  But Peter's admiration for his brother and his grief over the loss is real and palpable. 

Here’s a thing I will say

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