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Devra Torres

Evangelii Gaudium: The Rest of the Story

May. 19 at 9:46pm

In the grip of blogger’s block this week, I've decided to let Pope Francis do most of the talking.  Here, then, are some eye-catching thoughts from Evangelii gaudium, which I've been reading lately

EG isn't trending anymore. (IFunny to think that an apostolic exhortation ever was!) Still, tt's worth revisiting. When it first came out, many were disproportionately preoccupied with the translation of however you say "trickle-down economics" in Italian,

and we missed some memorable thoughts on other subjects.  Here are a few phrases that caught my eye:

“Aggressive tenderness”

Christian triumph is always a cross, yet a cross which is at the same time a victorious banner borne with

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Devra Torres

Beyond “Love the Sinner, Hate the Sin”

May. 11 at 11:14pm

I want to continue the conversation inspired by the video The Third Way: Homosexuality and the Catholic Church.  (It's mostly been transpiring on Facebook, but feel free to leave comments here, too.)

Joseph Prever in The Third Way

When he heard my title for this post, my husband asked jokingly if I thought it was time to start hating the sinner and loving the sin.

Well, no.  That’s not how I mean “beyond”: dumping a traditional idea and embracing its opposite.  Nor do I mean getting “beyond” the categories themselves, the concepts of “sin” and “sinner.”  

Friedrich Nietzsche  People have been laboring to get “beyond” good and evil, truth and falsehood, and male and female for a long time now. It’s getting clearer and clearer how very

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Devra Torres

Giving Joy a Bad Name

Jan. 6 at 9:34pm

Joy is no simple thing, it turns out.  Pope Francis invites us to experience the “Joy of the Gospel” and immediately the misconceptions spring up like—let’s see--like bundled-up children on a snow day in Michigan.

Here are two misreadings I’ve run into:

  • All this emphasis on joy betrays the sort of sentimental affective relativism I thought we'd left behind in the ‘70s--a call to scrap all concern for moral demands and “follow your heart.”

  • All this encouragement to experience joy amounts to compulsory cheeriness: it places suffering or depressed people under suspicion of spiritual inferiority for failure to keep up appearances. And it places everyone else under the obligation to mimic
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Devra Torres

Evangelizing the Complacent

Dec. 22, 2013, at 2:14am

Scarcely had I waded past the first paragraph of Evangelii Gaudium when I came across a very odd sentence.

It wasn’t about trickle-down economics, and it wasn’t about the salvation of atheists (although I just heard a good line about that: the question is not so much whether those who reject the Gospel can be saved, but whether we can be saved if we don’t preach it). 

No, this was not about the usual bones of contention.  The odd sentence was this:

The great danger in today’s world, pervaded as it is by consumerism, is the desolation and anguish born of a complacent yet covetous heart, the feverish pursuit of frivolous pleasures, and a blunted conscience.

Wait, what?  How can you be

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