Amazon.com Widgets

Only posts tagged with: Phenomenology | Display all

Katie van Schaijik

St. Benedict and phenomenology

Jul. 11, 2012, at 11:29am

The key to the kind of phenomenology Jules and I studied, which is sometimes called "realist phenomenology" or "von Hildebrandian phenomenology" is a reverent, attentive listening to the voice of Reality, to "things in themselves."  It sees "the art of living" as a matter of "receiving" what we find in reality, and responding to it faithfully. It stands in contrast to a way of philosophizing that is more concerned with constructing conceptual systems, or with studying texts.

One of the key features and contributions of von Hildeband's thought, in particular, is a rehabilitation of the role of the heart, not only in human relations, but in our apprehension of Reality.  The heart is not just

continue reading

Jules van Schaijik

Phenomenology and the art of persuasion

Mar. 20, 2012, at 9:39pm

Karol Wojtyla's most important philosophical work, The Acting Person, is not easy to read. So when I picked it up again recently, I decided to use a book by Rocco Buttiglione, a former professor of ours and a close friend and collaborator of Wojtyla, as a guide to better understand it. That was a good decision. (Though sometimes I feel the need for a third book to help me understand Buttiglione!)

So far I am re-learning some things about the way in which Wojtyla approaches his topic (the human person). This approach is so fruitful and so central to the mission of the Personalist Project, that I thought I should highlight at least 3 characteristic features of it.

1. Learning from the

continue reading

Katie van Schaijik

Deliberations

Sep. 14, 2010, at 11:34am

After an almost overwhelmingly rich and full summer, we are back home in West Chester.  Normal life has returned, and I have leisure to resume philosophical reading and thinking.

The other day someone asked me about phenomenology.  What is it? 
It’s not an easy question to answer, since there are so many different meanings of the term.  But one way of explaining it is as a deliberate effort at rightly centered, disencumbered thinking—a thinking that is first of all a listening, a stripping away of all prejudices and pre-conceptions in order to be purely and intelligently present to an important reality.  Perhaps it is person, or a moral experience.  The aim is to let that person or

continue reading

Stay informed

Latest comments

  • Re: On speaking what we feel
  • By: Katie van Schaijik
  • Re: On speaking what we feel
  • By: Peter
  • Re: On speaking what we feel
  • By: Peter
  • Re: On speaking what we feel
  • By: Katie van Schaijik
  • Re: On speaking what we feel
  • By: Peter
  • Re: On speaking what we feel
  • By: Peter
  • Re: Too Much, Too Little, Too Late
  • By: Peter
  • Re: Too Much, Too Little, Too Late
  • By: Katie van Schaijik
  • Re: Too Much, Too Little, Too Late
  • By: Peter
  • Re: Too Much, Too Little, Too Late
  • By: Peter

Latest active posts

Reading circles

Lectures