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Marie Meaney

Dwarfing the Other

May. 26 at 1:55pm

Sin attempts to dwarf the other, sizes him down to the level I want him to be. If I gossip, the other simply becomes something to be gloated over, belittled, and judged. In anger, I try to strike him down, so that he is nothing more than my perception of him; in my eyes he is nothing but the despicable act or vice to which I have reduced him. I will lash out at him again, if he tries to find excuses or claims to be other than my view of him; only if his anger matches mine, might I have to back down and get to taste my own medicine.

That this feature of dwarfing the other is present in many kinds of sin, is something I was struck by when discussing Katie van Schaijik’s blog-post on

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Marie Meaney

The Temptations of Beauty

Sep. 17, 2013, at 3:42am

It seems strange to be talking about beauty as a temptation. Isn’t beauty a ladder to God, a reflection of the good, and a dangerous trap only for those wishing to remain atheists?  The “blue flower” (so termed by the Romantics), which is, among other things, the longing for the re-occurrence of a momentous experience of beauty, became an important step, for example, in C. S. Lewis’ conversion-process. Yet it didn’t speak to him in an obvious way of God, and it was tempting for him to seek that experience again, though it (happily) eluded him.  For the experience of beauty cannot be forced, or artificially created or be obtained by one’s own free will; it comes as a gift, suddenly,

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Jules van Schaijik

Fr. Barron’s take on “The Hunger Games”

Mar. 28, 2012, at 6:46am

This morning, at national review online, I found this interesting article by Fr. Robert Barron on The Hunger Games. Using insights about the human tendency towards scapegoating, from Rene Girard, and about Christianity's role in eliminating it from western civilization, he suggests that the books/movie might be prophetic. In a post-Christian society, in which Christ can no longer take our sins upon his shoulders, who can?

The video below, nicely put together, covers the same ground as the article:

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